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Last feed update: Saturday February 13th, 2016 07:42:25 AM
Using stories to teach human values to artificial agents Friday February 12th, 2016 05:00:00 AM
(Georgia Institute of Technology) Artificial intelligence technique Quixote teaches 'value alignment' to robots by training them to read stories, learn acceptable sequences of events and understand successful ways to behave in human societies.

An engineer's valentine to children Friday February 12th, 2016 05:00:00 AM
(NYU Tandon School of Engineering) Children born with a certain congenital heart defect often need a percutaneous pulmonary valve surgically inserted when they are 10 to 15 years old. Vittoria Flamini, an industry assistant professor in NYU Tandon School of Engineering's Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, has developed computer simulations to determine if that surgery will be successful and if the necessary valve will fit in the individual's heart -- before the surgery takes place.

RIT to develop cybersecurity courses using warfare strategies and tactics Friday February 12th, 2016 05:00:00 AM
(Rochester Institute of Technology) A gift from Intel will allow Rochester Institute of Technology faculty to transform computing security education by developing new cybersecurity curriculum on strategic thinking and tactics.

New experimental test detects signs of Lyme disease near time of infection Friday February 12th, 2016 05:00:00 AM
(National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)) Team from NIST and Johns Hopkins suggests the novel approach might also be useful for early detection of other elusive bacterial infections.

New nanotechnology detects biomarkers of cancer Friday February 12th, 2016 05:00:00 AM
(Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center) Researchers at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center have developed a new technology to detect disease biomarkers in the form of nucleic acids, the building blocks of all living organisms.

Food availability a problem in smaller urban cities, a Kansas State University study finds Friday February 12th, 2016 05:00:00 AM
(Kansas State University) Michael Miller, doctoral student in sociology at Kansas State University, found food stores are largely unavailable in the most densely populated inner-city, low-income neighborhoods of smaller urban cities.

World Conference of Science Journalists announces details, sponsors for 2017 meeting Friday February 12th, 2016 05:00:00 AM
(National Association of Science Writers) Organizers of the 10th World Conference of Science Journalists (WCSJ2017) unveiled details of the conference at an information session held today at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Announcements included the debut of a comprehensive conference website (​http://wcsj2017.org​) and the enlistment of several major sponsors, including a 'Diamond Sponsor' contributing $400,000 toward the event.

Electronic healthcare records data reveal factors linked to emergency department revisits Friday February 12th, 2016 05:00:00 AM
(Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News) A new study has identified distinctions in patient diagnoses and different patterns of Emergency Department usage between individuals who are more or less likely to return to the ED for care within a 72-hour period. These results, based on statistical analysis of patient data from more than one million electronic healthcare records (EHR), are described in an article in Big Data.

Imaging with an 'optical brush' Friday February 12th, 2016 05:00:00 AM
(Massachusetts Institute of Technology) Researchers at the MIT Media Lab have developed a new imaging device that consists of a loose bundle of optical fibers, with no need for lenses or a protective housing.

UW scientists create ultrathin semiconductor heterostructures for new technologies Friday February 12th, 2016 05:00:00 AM
(University of Washington) University of Washington scientists have successfully combined two different ultrathin semiconductors -- each just one layer of atoms thick and roughly 100,000 times thinner than a human hair -- to make a new two-dimensional heterostructure with potential uses in clean energy and optically-active electronics.








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